News - Detroit River Hawk Watch

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News
2019 Binoculars Raffle!
Jerry Jourdan has generously donated a brand new pair of Nikon Monarch HG 10 x 42 binoculars to be raffled off with all proceeds going to the Detroit River Hawk Watch!

The raffle period has started with the drawing happening at Lake Erie Metropark's Hawkfest on September 22nd at 2:00 PM! Tickets are $20 each. Only 250 tickets will be sold. Tickets can be purchased online at the IWRA website or by calling (734) 755-0490.

2018 Season Summary
The 2018 count was the 36th consecutive season of monitoring diurnal raptor and turkey vulture migration at the mouth of the Detroit River, and the 21st year of consistent coverage at Lake Erie Metropark. There were 551 hours of data collection with counts conducted on 81 days between 1 September and 30 November. 120,712 total turkey vultures and raptors of 15 species were counted, which includes 6 unknown buteos, 3 unknown falcons, and 5 unknown raptors. This total was only 5% below the long-term average (LTA) for the count site. We compare this season’s totals to the respective LTA for each species since 1998. Turkey vultures (25%), American kestrels (24%), merlin (19%) and peregrine falcons (69%) were the only species counted above the LTA. Osprey (-68%), bald eagle (-55%), Cooper’s hawk (-74%), northern goshawk (-89%), broadwinged hawk (-25%), Swainson’s hawk (-28%), red-tailed hawk (-32%), rough-legged hawk (-39%) and golden eagle (-50%) were significantly lower than their respective LTA (where values >15% are considered “significant” for the count). Northern harrier (-9%), sharp-shinned hawk (-11%), red-shouldered hawk (-10%) numbers were insignificantly lower than the LTA. Two northern goshawk and three Swainson’s hawk were counted this year.  

The complete report can be read here.


2017 Fall Season Summary
Golden eagleThe 2017 count was the 35th consecutive season of monitoring diurnal raptor and Turkey Vulture migration at the mouth of the Detroit River, and the 20th year of
consistent coverage at Lake Erie Metropark. There were 636.75 hours of data collection with counts conducted on 89 days between 1 September and 30 November. 72,263 total Turkey Vultures and raptors of 15 species were counted, which includes 1 unknown accipiter, 7 unknown buteos, and 3 unknown raptors. We compare this season’s totals to the respective long-term average (LTA) for each species since 1998. Turkey Vultures (8%), Bald Eagles (34%), Merlin (26%) and Peregrine Falcons (58%) were the only species counted above the LTA. Osprey (-73%), Northern Harrier (-30%), Sharp-shinned Hawk (-33%), Cooper’s Hawk (-75%) Northern Goshawk (-90%), Red-shouldered Hawk (-44%), Broad-winged Hawk (-84%), Swainson’s Hawk (-52%), Red-tailed Hawk (-46%), American Kestrel (-40%) and total numbers (-43%) were significantly lower than the LTA (where values >15% are considered “significant” for the count). Rough-legged Hawk (-4%) and Golden Eagle (-5%) numbers were insignificantly lower than the LTA. Two Northern Goshawks and two Swainson’s Hawks were counted this year.

The complete report can be read here.

Welcome to new DRIWR Manager
Migration trend analysis graphsThe US Fish & Wildlife Service is pleased to announce the selection of Ms. Susan White as the Project Leader for Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge, Trenton, MI.

Ms. White is currently the Monuments Supervisor located in Hawai'i for 4 Marine National Monuments, leading and coordinating management of more than 576 million acres of ocean, islands, and atolls in the Pacific Ocean. Since 2007 she has managed Marine Monuments and Refuges with a focus on conservation of more than 23 million seabirds, vast coral reefs, 26 threatened or endangered species and their habitats, sacred cultural sites, iconic World War II historic resources, as well as supporting the perpetuation of indigenous cultures and traditions. Susan has led a team that coordinates with interagency, international, and traditional indigenous partners for conservation of some of the largest protected areas in the world.


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